Nothing Goes Viral Like A Virus

The 14th Century plague taught us we can survive anything and then life gets better.

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The port of Messina, Sicily receiving ships from the Black Sea

What can disruption teach us? Does it destroy or does it transform? Can it revive us? The 14th Century shares its secrets.

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The Plague gave birth to one of the world’s greatest disruptions.

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The world caved in.

This was disruption on a cataclysmic, global scale.

Or was it?

The good news about disruption.

Disruption can make us stronger.

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The Decameron by Giovanni Boccaccio, the first work of comedy, written in Florentine vernacular (not Latin) bringing literature to the masses

Disruption will always be with us.

We will continue to experience global disruptions, especially in the form of immigration or disease or terror. As the Medievals taught us, take time to understand, analyze, and persevere against ignorance, arrogance, and resistance to truth. How we react to disruption can have dire consequences greater than disruption itself.

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Written by

Producer of Extraordinary Lives 2019 @TellyAwards for documentaries @ IconicVoices.tv; Author of Be Somebody @ jeffcunningham.com; ex-publisher @Forbes

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